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Blog

Filtering by Tag: survivors

3 Things You Can Do To Help Today

Lindsey Malcolm

Over the last two days, we’ve shared with you why we’re opening our doors in Kampala, Uganda, explained how the funds we are raising will being spent, and introduced you to our first cohort of survivors.

We are certain our model of economic empowerment will help break the cycle of poverty, escape trafficking forever, and help them build bright futures for themselves and their families.

With 83% unemployment among Ugandan girls and young women, International Sanctuary may be the only employment opportunity available to them; without it, they may be forced, tricked, or sold into slavery. Our research has proven employment is the key to long-term success and total transformation.

With life pulling us in many directions, time has become a most precious resource. Thankfully, technology gives our supporters a path to quick, easy, and secure giving. Also, because of our incredibly generous donor who has agreed to match up to $50,000, taking a few minutes to donate will have twice the impact!

There are 3 powerful things you can do right now to help Bring Freedom to Uganda

  • Give -- So far, donors like you have opened the door of freedom to 33 girls. We still have 7 more invitations to give! Will you help one more begin her journey of healing?

  • Sponsor -- You can walk with our girls every step of the way when you give the gift of true freedom on a regular basis. Our automated system can securely process your payment every month, week, or quarter. Because PURPOSE covers all of the operating expenses, every dollar entrusted to us by our donors goes directly to serve survivors as they rebuild their lives.

  • Share -- After you give, introduce our cause to 3 people and ask them to get involved. Whether you email this blog to your family, post it on Facebook, or text the Bring Freedom to Uganda link to a friend, you can also make a difference by spreading the word!

She needed help.

Lindsey Malcolm

Little did she know when she boarded a flight from Seattle to San Francisco that Sheila Fredrick would become somebody’s hero. The Alaska Airlines flight attendant trained by Airlines Ambassadors International, an organization that has teamed up with the airline industry to protect vulnerable children knew the signs of what to look for.  Shelia was empowered to act when she saw a disheveled girl traveling with an older, well-groomed man. Something wasn't right.

And it wasn't.

Using a note in a lavatory, Shelia was able to discreetly communicate with the teen. When the flight attendant retrieved the note that read "I need help", she acted at once. Police were waiting when the flight landed. The girl was taken to a safe location and the man transporting her was taken into custody. 

This is a perfect example of the tremendous work our partners in the anti-trafficking realm are doing every day: training people to spot the signs, know how to act, and be a force for positive change. We are privileged to work along side these organizations to provide restorative and holistic care those those escaping trafficking.

Shelia, thanks for showing us that one person can truly make a difference!

Image from NBC News. 

Image from NBC News. 

But I'm just one person...

Lindsey Malcolm

How many times have you looked at a problem so big that you actually felt helpless against it? When we look at human trafficking - 45.8 million people being bought and sold in the world today -- it seems insurmountable. It seems too big for just one person...

"I am only one, but I am one. I can't do everything, but I can do something. The something I ought to do, I can do. And by the grace of God, I will."
-Edward Everett Hale

You are one person, and so am I. Your favorite barista, the UPS guy, the person who cuts your hair - they're each one person, too. But together, we have better odds! Suddenly, we've gone from one person to five people. Five people can raise $1,000. Five people can reach hundreds, maybe thousands on Facebook. Five people can fundamentally transform the lives of human trafficking survivors.

What if we were a team of 10? 50? 200??
Imagine the impact we could have!

Individuals are powerful beings. We all have stories. We are motivated by different things. We have different friends, different communities, different lives. And that is what makes the individual amazing: an enormous power contained in a single heart waiting to be ignited by a common cause. 

What's your story? How did you get involved in the fight against human trafficking? Do you give freedom through raising awareness, financial support, buying jewelry

Harness your power and build your team. Who are the 5 people you will share your story with? Take your story and share it with your friends on social media or via email - tell them why you care, and ask them to join your team. Set a goal and rally your team to achieve it!

Help us build a community dedicated to empowerment, freedom, and change. Together, we'll move mountains. Together, we can put an end to human trafficking.

Building The Academy

Lindsey Malcolm

Each morning, young women gather around a big table in our airy aqua-colored classroom. Large windows frame the table on two sides, bequeathing gracious views of the railroad and adjacent flooded salt flats that glint placidly under the languid Monsoon mist. The teacher begins the day with a check-in, reflection, and mindfulness exercise, in which students follow the flow of their breathing, get in touch with the present moment, and gather a peacefulness and focus to prepare for a day of conscientiousness and creativity. And from that moment, opportunities abound.

At iSanctuary, we know that school is a powerful defense against human trafficking, revictimization, intergenerational abuse, and poverty. We’ve developed The Academy so that the survivors we serve can arm themselves with education, gaining skills for upward mobility and economic autonomy, while strengthening their sense of self, purpose, worth, direction, and fulfillment.

 Few resources like The Academy currently exist for survivors of human trafficking in the rainy, marigold-speckled streets of Mumbai. After rescue, many survivors go to safe houses where they are out of immediate danger. But with resources stretched to serve an enormous population of survivors, education and vocational training programs are limited and crowded. At iSanctuary, we are establishing this missing resource. This was not a simple achievement. We know that a one-size fits all approach cannot affect the sustainable change that iSanctuary aims to create. So we committed ourselves to doing it right. Through meticulous quantitative assessments, interviews, and focus groups, we gauged participants’ current interests, knowledge, abilities, and mental state to construct an individualized program. We also asked participants about their priorities and hopes for their futures and for programs offered at iSanctuary. The information we collected helps us to identify appropriate learning resources, track individual participant progress, and contribute to program monitoring and evaluation. After examining the information gathered from our participants, in conjunction with best practices in the field and consultations with educational experts, we ascertained our specific programmatic and organizational needs. Our staff then developed curricula, policies, and benchmarks for The Academy.

To prepare for the launch of The Academy, we gradually introduced more class time in a variety of areas (self- defense, geography, English, goal-setting, health, and yoga, to name a few) to ease our participants into the transition and get excited about learning. This gave us an opportunity to observe their learning styles and make necessary adjustments to our plans. We will continue to develop and improve the efficacy of our learning environment through observation, assessments, and feedback.

After a rigorous hiring process, we welcomed a new teacher, social worker, and administrator to our team. From their first days on the job they have been hard at work developing and revising lesson plans while building a connection with our participants. Their training and expertise, as well as their sensitivity to participants’ needs, shared language, and common cultural upbringing position our new staff members to effectively and thoughtfully engage the students, identify and address their needs, and help iSanctuary achieve our long-term goals. Eventually we will bring on an additional teacher and social worker to ensure that we meet the widely varied needs of our participants.

With our new Academy, iSanctuary aims to provide resources for survivors to pursue their academic dreams and to obtain access to diverse jobs, higher salaries, and greater defense against future poverty and violence. Breaking down barriers to education—the hurdles both large and small that preclude girls from attending school—allows our participants to gain entry into an array of previously unattainable opportunities, safeguard their freedom, and realize their dreams.

By Kate Poor, Communication Liaison & Alyson Emory Holsclaw, Program Developer

Our Neighbor Nepal

Lindsey Malcolm

It's not uncommon for people who work with survivors of trauma to express amazement at the profound capacity survivors can display for compassion. We saw this in our office this last month after the devastating earthquakes in Nepal. India and Nepal share a geographical border. They also share a long cultural history and many persons of Nepali origin live in India. When news of the earthquake broke, many people here were deeply affected, including some of the ladies in our office.

After the quake, several of the ladies came to members of our office staff asking how they could help the people of Nepal. Some wanted to give money. Some wanted to donate clothing. One woman wanted to get on a train and show up in Kathmandu to help wherever she could. We were able to spend time with the ladies looking for and thinking about good organizations or groups of people who would be able to use their donated resources. In the end, a church that a couple of the ladies attend took an offering and those who wanted to give were able to do so there.

The women working in the iSanctuary Mumbai office saw the devastation. They felt sorrow and compassion. They wanted to help. Their compassion for other people, in spite of (or some might even argue because of) all that they have experienced in their lives, is inspiring. I am humbled by their desire to give, when they could easily say to themselves, “What could I possibly do in the face of this?” And it reminds me, when I am tempted to say the same thing of human trafficking, poverty, and violence, that all acts of human empathy, however small, still matter.

- Written By: Erin Arendse, India Program Liaison